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Where the heck is Imported?

Today I’m wearing a T-shirt from Robert Redford’s Sundance catalog.  It was Made in the USA.  I’m guessing that my T-shirt was made under good working conditions.

The reason I’m guessing is that I don’t have a whole lot to go on.  Sundance doesn’t have a code of social responsibility that I could find — unless, you count this stuff about the environment.  I’ve mentioned before that companies often shout from roof tops about the steps they have taken to ease their environmental impact (We care about the footprint, but what about the foot), but when it comes to social issues, their voices are mere murmurs if audible at all.

Still, I will give Sundance the benefit of the doubt that they do things right or at least…

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So You Want to Be A Writer

I wrote a piece – So You Want To Be An Author – for The Traveler’s Notebook outlining my eight year path to becoming a published author and sharing a few tips I learned along the way.

I’m always happy to help – the best I can – writers trying to find there way. I’ve been and still am on the receiving end of such help and like to pay it forward. Email me if you have any questions: kelsey@travelin-light.com…

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Barbie has more rights than the 16-year old girl who makes her

going-home-barbie

John Ruggie, UN expert on human rights, on supply chain monitoring:

Just about everybody, at least off the record, will tell you that monitoring doesn’t work and auditing of supplier factories doesn’t work because people cheat.

Ruggie is quoted in Women’s Wear Daily.  The piece goes on to mention that 70% of the factory audits are flawed and that the most viable option of monitoring and training lies with the Fair Labor Association.

The National Labor Committee was all over this report and makes a strong argument why labor laws must be upheld:

If Barbie Doll can be legally protected, by intellectual property and copyright laws, we sure…

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iPod contest coming soon

I’m hammering out the details on the upcoming iPod giveaway.  Details should be up Tuesday.  Big stuff in the works for next week. Lots of awesome posts coming….

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Where Am I Wearing? Cotton

I know what you are wearing.

Maybe your computer cam is on, you think.

Maybe I’m standing behind you.

Or maybe I know what you are wearing because we’re all wearing it — cotton.  (In fact, the first person who proves they aren’t wearing any cotton — nudity excluded — I’ll send a copy of my book “Where Am I Wearing?”). My shorts are 75% cotton and my shirt is 70% organic cotton.  Socks = all cotton.

I know what you are wearing and by checking the “Made in Labels” you know where you are wearing, but there is one question that I’m betting neither one of us can answer: where is the cotton we are wearing from?

A lot of cotton is still produced right here in the U.S. If your T-shirt says…

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Have a look around

Today is the unofficial launch of the new site. We’re still tweaking some things but would love to hear what you think. Next week is the official launch and we’ve got a bunch of fun stuff planned including the iPod giveaway.

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A big thanks to BootsnAll

Since early in 2007, BootsnAll.com has hosted this blog for free.  Today all that changes.

In high school and college I never knew anyone that had or even wanted to throw a few possessions in their backpack and head out for a few months to a foreign land.  Call me sheltered, but at the time I wondered if people even did this sort of thing.  When I started to float the idea with family and friends, most of them never knew either.

Enter BootsnAll and their community of friendly travelers. Their message boards are filled with like-minded folks who are happy to lend help with an itinerary or packing list.

I’ve always felt indebted to the community Sean Keener and Chris Heidrich have created.  They helped me…

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At Home in Utopia

With GM and Chrylser going bankrupt there’s a lot of blame that gets directed towards unions.  Unionized labor at GM costs $71 per hour.  In comparions Toyota has no unions and their labor cost is only $47 per hour.

Joann Muller wrote a great piece in Forbes on why the unions aren’t to blame.  She writes that one of the major expenses GM faces aren’t employees being paid that much more than the workers at Japanese automakers, but the legacy costs.

it’s misleading to suggest that Detroit autoworkers are paid $71 an hour. About $17 of that is the cost of health care insurance for retirees. General Motors has 442,000 retirees in North America, four times as many current employees. Toyota has only 371 retirees in…

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